LILAC CHASER

24.10 – 24.11.2018

A solo exhibition by Heidi Fourie

Lilac Chaser is Heidi Fourie’s second solo exhibition at Salon91. The show marks a move away from more typical landscape formats to embrace concerns with contemporary perception. Her imagery is inspired by hikes in Grootkloof in the Magaliesberg region, which is characterised as being a shady and dramatic abyss with unique rock formations and reflective pools. Fourie describes the experience of being in the kloof as confronting a mysterious and unfathomable landscape characterised by notions of the hidden or mystical.

In applying her painter’s eye to the experience of natural space, Fourie translates the immersive state of being in the landscape into a journey within paint. She interrogates the tools of her trade: colour theory, the material quality of paint and the demands of illusionary visual perception, into a confrontation with the inner struggle demanded of the artist in the act of creating.

The term, Lilac Chaser, refers to a visual illusion also known as the Pac-Man illusion. The illusion involves the eye perceiving a green disk when all that is represented are lilac disks on a grey field. The term succinctly holds together Fourie’s various concerns in this new body of work. From the very personal experience of manifesting the missing the colour green amidst the brown winter landscape of Pretoria to the more philosophical, painter’s journey: how to express the hidden and mystical experiences of landscape within illusionary qualities of paint.

 

ARTWORKS:

 

 

INSTALLATION VIEWS:

 


GREEN IS THE COLOUR | Written by Natasha Norman

The late Capetonian writer and poet, Stephen Watson, writes fondly of walking in Table Mountain range as a “stepping inside, not outside” of experience. “Consciousness has its doodles,” he muses, “and walking has a way of setting them off.” For him, as for Heidi Fourie, walking or hiking the world beyond our urban infrastructure has a way of revealing a certain inner realm, what Watson also describes as a ‘confrontation with otherness.’ Fourie’s experience of hiking the Groot Kloof Nature Reserve in the Magaliesburg Region in the middle of a dry, brown Pretoria winter, finds expression in this body of paintings as a confrontation with the edge of intellectual activity and the mysterious nature of the colour ‘green’.

In the dreamy, unknowable spaces of natural gullies and steep waterfalls where “light, washed clean, salts the shadows with a blackness” (Watson again), Fourie is confronted with a sense of mystical appreciation she can only describe as awe. This immersive experience has encouraged her to move away from the typical landscape format in her works in favour of long vertical canvases that stand together in formation or in reference to scenic windows. In this way, she foregrounds the act of looking out on landscape as one fraught with visual constraints, highlighting the limitations of convention in expressing experience.

Taking the experience of Groot Kloof back to the studio, Fourie has initiated an interrogation of perception, beginning with the techniques of painting. The reductive or removed mark, which has consistently been a feature of her work, is here combined with a more methodological approach to colour. In her pursuit of the non-visible or that part of experience that one feels rather than sees she has aptly cited the Pac-Man illusion, lilac chaser, in evoking the invisible.

The lilac chaser illusion gained popularity on the Internet in 2005. It results from the combination of the phi phenomenon (the illusion of perceiving continuous motion from a series of still images viewed in rapid succession) and the afterimage effect. When the eye is exposed to a circle of lilac colour on a grey or neutral surface, and that colour vanishes, one perceives a circle of the complementary colour, green, in its place. In a gif of lilac circles appearing and disappearing in succession, one perceives a green circle appearing to ‘chase’ the disappearing lilac circle. Physiologically, the human sense of perception consistently causes one to perceive colours that are not actually present in a space. One is reminded of the artist James Turrell’s light installations in museums and galleries where rooms flooded with a bright hue cause a viewer to see the complimentary hue, as vividly, upon exiting the room. As the afterimage in the mind’s eye fades, so the illusion vanishes.

In addition to colour, Fourie has interrogated mark and texture in this series by including a series of collages created from the paper palettes she uses while mixing paint. In a conscious consideration of the tension between spontaneity and intention in the creative process, she exposes the shift between the generative decision making in painting to the curated decision making of collage. Whether found or created, the mark is as important a vehicle of perception in painting as colour. So much can be deduced from a mark’s temperament, functioning like the adjectives or adverbs of a text. Laden or erased, heavy or light, Fourie’s descriptive mark is isolated as a found object from her palette and recontextualised in a collage, exploiting a double game of illusion and materiality.

Even if one is intellectually aware of the illusionary nature of perception, or the techniques employed by artists to create illusionistic spaces of pictorial depth, it does not prevent one from experiencing it. As such, this physiological experience sits at the edge of intellectual activity as a means of seeing the invisible. While Fourie’s exhibition is titled Lilac Chaser, an understanding of its meaning reveals it to be nothing to do with the colour lilac, but rather that which is invisible and mysterious. As David Gilmore crooned in 1969, “Green is the colour of her kind, quickness of the eye deceives the mind.”

Ref: Stephen Watson, 2010. The Music in the Ice: On Writers, Writing and Other Things. Penguin Group: South Africa.
Marco Beramini, 2016. “Lilac Chaser Illusion” in Vision, Illusion and Perception. [online] (www.reserachgate.net.)
Pink Floyd, 1969. “Green is the Colour” from the Album, More. Lupus Music Co.:U.K. Composed by Roger Waters, originally sung by David Gilmour.

 

FNB JOBURG ART FAIR 2018

06 – 09.09.2018

Salon Ninety One participating in the 11th annual FNB Joburg Art Fair. Visit us at Booth C02.

 

ARTWORKS:

 

HEIDI FOURIE

 

KATRIN COETZER

 

KIRSTEN BEETS

 

KIRSTEN SIMS

 

Triptych

 

 

 

LINSEY LEVENDALL

 

PAUL SENYOL

TURBINE ART FAIR 2018

12.07 – 15.07.2018

Booth Number GH13 | Turbine Hall | Johannesburg

Salon Ninety One is a Cape Town based gallery, presenting works by emerging and established contemporary artists of all disciplines, passionate about developing a new brand of local talent. The gallery specializes in accessible contemporary South African Art, Design and illustration. Founded during 2008 by Monique du Preez, (Married name, Foord), curator and director to the space and its highly energized exhibition program. The gallery presented a selection of contemporary work ranging from painting, textile, print, drawing, and to a smaller degree photography and sculpture, with a special emphasis on collaborative projects and bridging the traditional divide between disciplines. Salon91 offered international and local collectors, as well as first-time buyers unique investment opportunities into the emerging South African art market.

Salon Ninety One exhibited at the Turbine Art Fair at the Turbine Hall in Johannesburg, South Africa, for the fifth consecutive year. Visitors to the gallery’s booth did enjoy works by their regular Salon Ninety One TAF favourites such as Amber Moir, Andrew Sutherland, Black Koki, Bruce Mackay, Cathy Layzell, Georgina Berens, Kirsten Beets, Kirsten Sims, Mareli Esterhuizen, Paul Senyol, Heidi Fourie, and Zarah Cassim, to mention only a few, as well as exciting newcomers to the fair, including Chloe Townsend, Berry Meyer, Katrine Claassens, Lili Probart, Matthew Prins, NEBNIKRO, Renée Rossouw, Sarah Pratt, Tara Deacon & more. Expect to see collage, painting, photography, ceramics, monotypes, reverse glass works, and drawings, executed in a rich winter’s palette, articulated with cool midnight hues, and bursts of warm jewel colours. The space did feature large and medium sized works by the various exhibiting artists, as well as two group projects, including a collection of diminutive works.


 

INSTALLATION PREVIEW IN TURBINE #3 |  ‘SHEATHED’ by JENNA BARBE


 

ARTWORKS:

 

ADELE VAN HEERDEN

 

AMBER MOIR

 

ANDREW SUTHERLAND

 

BERRY MEYER

 

BLACK KOKI

 

BRUCE MACKAY

 

CATHERINE HOLTZHAUSEN

 

CATHY LAYZELL

 

CHLOE TOWNSEND

 

GEORGINA BERENS

 

HEIDI FOURIE

 

JACO HAASBROEK

 

JEANNE HOFFMAN

 

JESSICA BOSWORTH SMITH

 

KATRINE CLAASSENS

 

KIRSTEN BEETS

 

KIRSTEN SIMS

 

LILI PROBART

 

LINSEY LEVENDALL

 

MARELI ESTERHUIZEN

 

MARIA VAN ROOYEN

…to follow

 

MATTHEW PRINS

 

NEBNIKRO

 

PAUL SENYOL

 

 

RENEE ROSSOUW

 

SARAH PRATT

 

TARA DEACON

 

ZARAH CASSIM

INVESTEC CAPE TOWN ART FAIR 2018

16.02 -18.02.2018

SALON NINETY ONE | BOOTH B4 | Cape Town International Convention Centre

Featured Artists:
Kirsten Beets
Zarah Cassim
Heidi Fourie
Black Koki
Cathy Layzell
Linsey Levendall
Tahiti Pehrson
Paul Senyol
Kirsten Sims
Maria van Rooyen

 


 

ARTWORKS:

 

BLACK KOKI

 

CATHY LAYZELL

 

COLLABORATION | CATHY LAYZELL AND PAUL SENYOL

 

HEIDI FOURIE

 

KIRSTEN BEETS

 

KIRSTEN SIMS

 

LINSEY LEVENDALL

 

MARIA VAN ROOYEN

 

PAUL SENYOL

 

 

TAHITI PEHRSON

 

ZARAH CASSIM

 


ARTIST BIOS:

Click on links download PDF

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Black Koki

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Cathy Layzell

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Heidi Fourie

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Kirsten Beets

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Kirsten Sims

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Linsey Levendall

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Maria van Rooyen

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Paul Senyol

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Tahiti Pehrson

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Zarah Cassim

 


RELATED LINKS:

INTERVIEW | Pink Skies Keep me Warm | 8th February 2018 | Zarah Cassim on introspection, secrecy and intimacy

 

FIELD

25.10 – 25.11.2017

Group Exhibition

Featured Artists:

Kirsten Beets
Georgina Berens
Heidi Fourie
Jeanne Hoffman
Kirsten Lilford
Berry Meyer
Natasha Norman
Gabrielle Raaff
Kirsten Sims

 

ARTWORKS:

KIRSTEN BEETS

 

GEORGINA BERENS

 

HEIDI FOURIE

 

JEANNE HOFFMAN

 

KIRSTEN LILFORD

 

BERRY MEYER

 

NATASHA NORMAN

 

GABRIELLE RAAFF

 

KIRSTEN SIMS

 


 

EXHIBITION INSTALLATION VIEWS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TREES MAKE FORESTS

02.12.2017 – 20.01.2018

SALON NINETY ONE end-of-year group show in aid of the Peninsula School Feeding Association | Saturday 02 December at 11AM | 91 Kloof Street, Gardens, Cape Town

This year, 10% of all sales will go towards the Peninsula School Feeding Association and the many children they support.

Hungry children struggle to concentrate and the deficits of under-nutrition becomes irreversible if not addressed. The Peninsula School Feeding Association provides breakfasts and lunches to 27 270 hungry learners at a total of 160 educational institutions across the Western Cape. These meals provide regular balanced nutrition across all food groups as well as incentive to attend school and to help children focus on their studies. For more information, please visit their website.

For any enquiries, please contact the gallery on 021-424-6930

Exhibiting Artists:
Amber Moir
Andrew Sutherland
Berry Meyer
Black Koki
Carla Kreuser
Cathy Layzell
Donna Solovei
Gabrielle Raaff
Georgina Berens
Gerhard Human
Hanien Conradie
Heidi Fourie
Jaco Haasbroek
Jade Klara
Jeanne Hoffman
Katrine Claassens
Kirsten Beets
Kirsten Lilford
Kirsten Sims
Lara Feldman
Maaike Bakker
Mareli Esterhuizen
Maria Lebedeva
Matthew Prins
Maximillian Goldin
Mieke Van Der Merwe
Natasha Norman
Paul Senyol
Peter Claassens
Sean Gibson
Zarah Cassim

 

ARTWORKS:

AMBER MOIR

ANDREW SUTHERLAND

BERRY MEYER

BLACK KOKI

CARLA KREUSER

COLLABORATION: CATHY LAYZELL | PAUL SENYOL

DONNA SOLOVEI

GABRIELLE RAAFF

GEORGINA BERENS

GERHARD HUMAN

HANIEN CONRADIE

HEIDI FOURIE

JACO HAASBROEK

JADE KLARA

JEANNE HOFFMAN

KATRINE CLAASSENS