RAISING AWARENESS

The Wavescape Art Board Project has been raising awareness and funds for ocean related charities since 2005. Run by the Wavescape Festival, each year, artists are invited to turn signature surfboards into works of art for an exhibition that ends with an auction. Salon Ninety One is proud to announce participating gallery artists Paul Senyol, Kirsten Beets and Andrew Sutherland

 

 

This year’s exhibition and auction night will be presented by Jack Black Beer, with support from the South African PET Plastic Recycling Company, Cape Town and Western Cape Film and Media Promotion (a division of Wesgro), Long Beach Capital, York, Gone, & Mami Wata. The Main beneficiaries of the project are the NSRI, Shark Spotters, 9 Miles Project, Adaptive Surfing South Africa, Ocean Pledge and the Beach Co-op. Contributing artists have included Asha Zero, Jake Aikman, Sanell Aggenbach, Andrew Whitehouse, Willie Bester, Conrad Botha, Beezy Bailey, Wim Botha, Guy Tillim, Brett Murray, Conn Bertish, Kirsten Sims, Justin Fiske, Roger Ballen, Peter Eastman, Richard Scott, Gabby Raaff, ND Mazin, Mikhael Subotsky, Richard Hart, Anton Kannemeyer, Peter van Straten, Kim Longhurst, Scott Robertson, Zapiro, Chip Snaddon, Mr Fuzzy Slipperz, Varenka Paschke, Osnat de Villiers & more. These and many other artists have kindly donated their time and talent to make the ArtBoard Project a success.

The exhibition will be open for viewing from 10am until 5pm daily from the 20thof November and will run until the 28thof November. On the 28thdoors open at 6pm and the auction will start at 7:30pm. Venue: The Jack Black Tap Room, 10 Brigid Road, Diep River. Call 021 205 1991 or visit www.wavescapefestival.com for more info.

View the full auction catalogue here:
https://bit.ly/2z7zf51

RECOLLECTIONARY

19.09 – 20.10.2018

Paul Senyol celebrates 10 years with Salon Ninety One

Salon Ninety One & Paul Senyol are truly proud and grateful to be celebrating a decade of working, growing and exhibiting together, as well as the beautiful friendship that has formed between Gallery and Artist over the years. Paul Senyol & Wesley van Eeden were the first artists to exhibit at Salon91 back in October 2008 in a two-man show, beautifully named Under These Skies. The Gallery and Artist will be marking the event and this special relationship with an exhibition titled Recollectionary: 10 Years of Paul Senyol & Salon Ninety One. This solo show takes on the form of a mini-retrospective featuring works on paper, board, canvas, as well as found objects and more, and will be accompanied by the launch of a publication, centered around the Artist’s development and innovation between 2008 and 2018. Recollectionary is on view at Salon Ninety One from the 19th of September until the 20th of October 2018.

 

ARTWORKS:

 

INSTALLATION VIEWS:

 


 

RELATED TO THIS EXHIBIT:

RECOLLECTIONARY | An Interview with Artist Paul Senyol

by Natasha Norman

 

I have been coming to visit Paul at his studio in Woodstock for some years now. As I turn off the main road, bannered with newer, brighter street art, and begin to meander the one-way street network the homely scratches and scribbles of the local community take over. I see traces of Paul’s early street works and also notice the things that have been erased.

He always greets with a bright smile no matter how little sleep he’s getting as a new father. Our conversation traverses the familiar and foreign territory of a new body of work in progress as I sip tea and consider the canvases in various states of progress before us.

 

Natasha Norman: Your show is called Recollectionary, it’s about thinking back on the last ten years of making work. How do thoughts about the past come into these new works for the show?

Paul Senyol: The works are straddling something, recollecting those thoughts and ideas and shapes and forms and colours. Some of the works are literal reinterpretations of some of the older works. I’ve taken an old painting from 2010 or 2011 and quite intentionally replicated certain colours, certain patterns and shapes. The viewer would really have to scrounge around to get the original reference, I think. But I’m being quite intentional.

NN: And how does that feel?

PS: It’s cool. I like looking back. I like assimilating. I like putting things back together. I’m enjoying it. I think I’d like to paint a bit more that way in the future. I’d like to think a bit more about the history, in a sense, a bit more about the amount of visual information floating around in my head (laughs). I feel like those older works have given a spark to what’s happening here.

NN: That links to some of the things we discussed when we looked back at your works. You were showing me images of walls that you’d done and then said, ‘oh, that’s no longer there,’ or, ‘this still exists.’ In the street, there’s a very real process, over time that edits.

PS: I always like the idea that someone is going to peel bits of wall away in Woodstock, like a cross-section, and expose layers of paint. It happens in many places but particularly in Woodstock it will be a Recollectionary of those conversations or passers by, which is quite interesting.

NN: You layer your works quite hectically from start to finish. In the process the surfaces are quite transformed. Does that mimic the process on the street?

PS: I suppose it does. That’s not the intention when I start the painting, to mimic that process, but I think subconsciously I just do.

NN: It’s a process you have an affinity with.

PS: Ja. I suppose it just comes with being very DIY and self-taught. That’s my process of reinterpretation and assimilation, I suppose. In terms of painting, that’s just the way it finds expression.

NN: Do you find the process thrilling?

PS: Ja, ja, ja. It’s quite intimidating at the start, when you just start. For me it can be quite intimidating, having this canvas, but even just having the drawing in front of me is a bit of an exhale. And then when I just start to play a little bit with the first brushstrokes that are more unintentional at the start: washes or the first brush marks, as long as I’ve started that then I can start to think a little more clearly about what’s going to happen on the canvas. Even though I have the drawing, it’s still quite spontaneous when I paint. Stuff changes. Colours change and the stuff that I’ve traced there will not be one hundred percent as it’s mapped out there.

NN: You said that having the drawing there made you exhale, with relief. But you didn’t always have the drawing as part of your process.

PS: I think I discovered that way of working in about 2011. So it’s quite a few years down the road now. That’s primarily how I paint now. To some degree I do still dip back into spontaneity and I don’t worry too much about what I’m thinking. I’m rather just going to paint and see. That’s quite a cool way of painting for me.

NN: What do you see as the function of installation or sculpture in your exhibitions?

PS: In shows previously I have worked in installation and I would like to carry some of that stuff forward. They function as reference points. I have a few objects that I want to show, I don’t see them as particularly part of an installation but they are sculptural. As objects they have a shape and form that is interesting.
I’ve taken these objects out of their natural environment and put them in a temporary space that informs the work.

NN: People are forced to consider those objects differently in your exhibitions. If they had seen them on the street they might have walked past or ignored them.

PS: Ja. I don’t know if I showed you that nice, big, fat piece of sidewalk? No, I told you about it. It’s incredibly heavy, so heavy. I just managed to get it into the back of the car without, like, chopping my toes off. And I’ve got this great, old skateboard, which was my first skateboard, which was my Dad’s first skateboard. I don’t know how many years old, but it’s got clay wheels. In the gallery space there will be a place for me to paint on the wall and have these objects on the wall and then one or two paintings that I feel would fit with those objects.

NN: So it’s about these conversations between things, I see that as a theme throughout your body of work: you wrote letters to Andrew that you delivered to each other.

PS: The Woodstock Post.

NN: Yes, they were physical objects you exchanged as well as having conversations with other writers on the street: graffiti phrases that each of you wrote responses to on public walls. So the space of your work has changed but you still want to encourage a conversation to happen in the mind of the viewer.

PS: When I first tried to explore the gallery route I got rejected. People didn’t want to see my work or show it. So my reason for putting work on the street was, well if they’re not going to see it in the galleries then they can just see it on the sidewalk or street corner. So that’s how I started exhibiting. I felt my work was worthy to be seen and people might like it. If they want to see it they can and if they don’t then they can just look away. So ja, that engagement with the viewer, for me, is important. If a painting moves someone – they really like it – then I think I’m succeeding as a painter, as a creative, in doing something. Not everybody is going to enjoy it, it’s not everybody’s cup of tea, abstract painting, but I think that within abstract painting there is something of a feeling that gets ‘conversed’ through the work. I supposed I’m after that.

NN: By ‘a feeling’ do you mean that through your work you’re trying to connect with something in someone else?

PS: No, it’s not like I’m trying to connect with them. It’s that I want them to see something beautiful. Painting for me is about making something beautiful and making beautiful things. If someone says that about my work then I’m happy. Then I’ve succeeded and they’ve got it.

NN: They’ve understood.

PS: Ja. They’ve understood. I’m not necessarily about people saying, “What is it?” Or, “What is this?” “Tell me what’s going on here.” There are figurative elements but they’re radically abstracted. I know where I’ve drawn that source from, maybe a book or a magazine or on my travels through the city, but people don’t necessarily need to know that, it’s not what I’m after. That’s not interesting to me.

NN: It also seems to be about slowing down the gaze. To consider things, usually thought of as disposable as quite beautiful.

PS: Ja, very much so. I like that: the edges, the margins. I like the spaces in between. Yes. That’s interesting to explore.

NN: Have you always liked those spaces?

PS: Probably. I think skateboarding initially highlighted those spaces to me: those places and those objects and those things. So that’s where that connection comes in.

We begin to look at a work on the wall of his studio.

NN: What is it called?

PS: Margymnal.

NN: Margymnal? I don’t know what that means.

PS: Ha ha! Nobody does! Only me. It’s a title that I made up. A lot of the starting points for these paintings have also been older works where I’ve changed the titles or played with titles a bit. So Margymnal is the same as Recollectionary, it’s two words in one. Margymnal is ‘hymnal’ and ‘margin’ put together. So that’s the title. Bit of a tongue twister.

NN: How do you decide on a title?

PS: I like to give them names, like the name of a person. I like that part of a title. I like a title to carry some sort of weight, as opposed to just untitled works. I like to give my works a character. The work already has character but the title, I’m hoping, complements or highlights that character.

NN: We’ve conducted this interview at the end of a long day of painting. Do you have any concluding thoughts on the act of painting itself?

PS: In a day or two’s time there’s going to be something on that canvas that wasn’t there before. Painting is exploring and, not scientific necessarily, but pretty awesome. To create something is … ja … I’d like to think about that some more.


Natasha Norman is a practicing artist and freelance writer. She has written and published on Contemporary South African Artists in both popular and peer reviewed journals. She has worked with artists on text for their exhibitions since 2007 and currently lectures part-time at Universities and Institutions throughout South Africa. On her days off, she surfs.

FNB JOBURG ART FAIR 2018

06 – 09.09.2018

Salon Ninety One participating in the 11th annual FNB Joburg Art Fair. Visit us at Booth C02.

 

ARTWORKS:

 

HEIDI FOURIE

 

KATRIN COETZER

 

KIRSTEN BEETS

 

KIRSTEN SIMS

 

Triptych

 

 

 

LINSEY LEVENDALL

 

PAUL SENYOL

TURBINE ART FAIR 2018

12.07 – 15.07.2018

Booth Number GH13 | Turbine Hall | Johannesburg

Salon Ninety One is a Cape Town based gallery, presenting works by emerging and established contemporary artists of all disciplines, passionate about developing a new brand of local talent. The gallery specializes in accessible contemporary South African Art, Design and illustration. Founded during 2008 by Monique du Preez, (Married name, Foord), curator and director to the space and its highly energized exhibition program. The gallery presented a selection of contemporary work ranging from painting, textile, print, drawing, and to a smaller degree photography and sculpture, with a special emphasis on collaborative projects and bridging the traditional divide between disciplines. Salon91 offered international and local collectors, as well as first-time buyers unique investment opportunities into the emerging South African art market.

Salon Ninety One exhibited at the Turbine Art Fair at the Turbine Hall in Johannesburg, South Africa, for the fifth consecutive year. Visitors to the gallery’s booth did enjoy works by their regular Salon Ninety One TAF favourites such as Amber Moir, Andrew Sutherland, Black Koki, Bruce Mackay, Cathy Layzell, Georgina Berens, Kirsten Beets, Kirsten Sims, Mareli Esterhuizen, Paul Senyol, Heidi Fourie, and Zarah Cassim, to mention only a few, as well as exciting newcomers to the fair, including Chloe Townsend, Berry Meyer, Katrine Claassens, Lili Probart, Matthew Prins, NEBNIKRO, Renée Rossouw, Sarah Pratt, Tara Deacon & more. Expect to see collage, painting, photography, ceramics, monotypes, reverse glass works, and drawings, executed in a rich winter’s palette, articulated with cool midnight hues, and bursts of warm jewel colours. The space did feature large and medium sized works by the various exhibiting artists, as well as two group projects, including a collection of diminutive works.


 

INSTALLATION PREVIEW IN TURBINE #3 |  ‘SHEATHED’ by JENNA BARBE


 

ARTWORKS:

 

ADELE VAN HEERDEN

 

AMBER MOIR

 

ANDREW SUTHERLAND

 

BERRY MEYER

 

BLACK KOKI

 

BRUCE MACKAY

 

CATHERINE HOLTZHAUSEN

 

CATHY LAYZELL

 

CHLOE TOWNSEND

 

GEORGINA BERENS

 

HEIDI FOURIE

 

JACO HAASBROEK

 

JEANNE HOFFMAN

 

JESSICA BOSWORTH SMITH

 

KATRINE CLAASSENS

 

KIRSTEN BEETS

 

KIRSTEN SIMS

 

LILI PROBART

 

LINSEY LEVENDALL

 

MARELI ESTERHUIZEN

 

MARIA VAN ROOYEN

…to follow

 

MATTHEW PRINS

 

NEBNIKRO

 

PAUL SENYOL

 

 

RENEE ROSSOUW

 

SARAH PRATT

 

TARA DEACON

 

ZARAH CASSIM

INVESTEC CAPE TOWN ART FAIR 2018

16.02 -18.02.2018

SALON NINETY ONE | BOOTH B4 | Cape Town International Convention Centre

Featured Artists:
Kirsten Beets
Zarah Cassim
Heidi Fourie
Black Koki
Cathy Layzell
Linsey Levendall
Tahiti Pehrson
Paul Senyol
Kirsten Sims
Maria van Rooyen

 


 

ARTWORKS:

 

BLACK KOKI

 

CATHY LAYZELL

 

COLLABORATION | CATHY LAYZELL AND PAUL SENYOL

 

HEIDI FOURIE

 

KIRSTEN BEETS

 

KIRSTEN SIMS

 

LINSEY LEVENDALL

 

MARIA VAN ROOYEN

 

PAUL SENYOL

 

 

TAHITI PEHRSON

 

ZARAH CASSIM

 


ARTIST BIOS:

Click on links download PDF

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Black Koki

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Cathy Layzell

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Heidi Fourie

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Kirsten Beets

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Kirsten Sims

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Linsey Levendall

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Maria van Rooyen

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Paul Senyol

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Tahiti Pehrson

ARTIST BIO [CTAF2018] Zarah Cassim

 


RELATED LINKS:

INTERVIEW | Pink Skies Keep me Warm | 8th February 2018 | Zarah Cassim on introspection, secrecy and intimacy

 

TREES MAKE FORESTS

02.12.2017 – 20.01.2018

SALON NINETY ONE end-of-year group show in aid of the Peninsula School Feeding Association | Saturday 02 December at 11AM | 91 Kloof Street, Gardens, Cape Town

This year, 10% of all sales will go towards the Peninsula School Feeding Association and the many children they support.

Hungry children struggle to concentrate and the deficits of under-nutrition becomes irreversible if not addressed. The Peninsula School Feeding Association provides breakfasts and lunches to 27 270 hungry learners at a total of 160 educational institutions across the Western Cape. These meals provide regular balanced nutrition across all food groups as well as incentive to attend school and to help children focus on their studies. For more information, please visit their website.

For any enquiries, please contact the gallery on 021-424-6930

Exhibiting Artists:
Amber Moir
Andrew Sutherland
Berry Meyer
Black Koki
Carla Kreuser
Cathy Layzell
Donna Solovei
Gabrielle Raaff
Georgina Berens
Gerhard Human
Hanien Conradie
Heidi Fourie
Jaco Haasbroek
Jade Klara
Jeanne Hoffman
Katrine Claassens
Kirsten Beets
Kirsten Lilford
Kirsten Sims
Lara Feldman
Maaike Bakker
Mareli Esterhuizen
Maria Lebedeva
Matthew Prins
Maximillian Goldin
Mieke Van Der Merwe
Natasha Norman
Paul Senyol
Peter Claassens
Sean Gibson
Zarah Cassim

 

ARTWORKS:

AMBER MOIR

ANDREW SUTHERLAND

BERRY MEYER

BLACK KOKI

CARLA KREUSER

COLLABORATION: CATHY LAYZELL | PAUL SENYOL

DONNA SOLOVEI

GABRIELLE RAAFF

GEORGINA BERENS

GERHARD HUMAN

HANIEN CONRADIE

HEIDI FOURIE

JACO HAASBROEK

JADE KLARA

JEANNE HOFFMAN

KATRINE CLAASSENS

KIRSTEN BEETS

KIRSTEN LILFORD

KIRSTEN SIMS

LARA FELDMAN

MAAIKE BAKKER

MARELI ESTERHUIZEN

MARIA LEBEDEVA

MATTHEW PRINS

MAXIMILLIAN GOLDIN

MIEKE VAN DER MERWE

NATASHA NORMAN

PAUL SENYOL

PETER CLAASSENS

SEAN GIBSON

ZARAH CASSIM